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The iPad gets a Facebook app, finally

Kind of like eating a peanut butter sandwich with no jelly, the most obvious app missing from the iPad has been Facebook -- until today. The New York Times reports that the site has finally confirmed the app's availability just in time for eager social networkers to like, subscribe and stalk from the slate. According to software engineer Leon Dubinsky, the app will highlight the multitouch awesomeness of the iPad, something that's unavailable from the website alone even from a touchscreen device. The folks at FB also added that some of the newly released features will be integrated into the iPhone app as well, making it a win / win for iOS fanatics. Consider it liked. Check out the brief PR after the break.

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The iPad gets a Facebook app, finally originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 10 Oct 2011 16:33:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink The New York Times  |  sourceFacebook  | Email this | Comments
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iTunes and iWork updated for Lion, add full-screen support, and resume

iTunes 10.4
What good is an OS update without some software that can take full advantage of all its fancy new features? Naturally, Apple's got your back, and today you'll be getting some spiffy new versions of iTunes and iWork to compliment that fearsome Lion upgrade. iTunes 10.4 finally ushers the music management app into the 64-bit era, and adds support for OS X 10.7's full-screen windows. The iWork Update 6 also brings along the distraction-free functionality, as well as resume, auto-save, and versioning for all your important docs. Not everyone is seeing the updates just yet, so be patient, it shouldn't be much longer before your interrupted by that slightly annoying, but oh so satisfying, Software Update window.

iTunes and iWork updated for Lion, add full-screen support, and resume originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 20 Jul 2011 13:38:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceApple Insider, iLounge  | Email this | Comments
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Google announces Search by Image, Search by Voice for desktop, revamped mobile search

Google's done a ton of talking about search at its Inside Search event today, and two of the biggest new developments are on the desktop. It's just announced that Android-style Search by Voice is headed to desktop web browsers (with support for English only, initially), and that it will be joined by a new Search by Image feature. To use that latter, you simply drag and drop an image or cut and paste an image URL in the search box, and then Google tries its best to recognize it and deliver relevant results -- including identifying the location in an old vacation photo, for instance (though Google notes it isn't doing face recognition). Both features will be rolling out over the next few days, and they'll each require Chrome (or a Firefox extension in the case of Search by Image). Head on past the break for a pair of videos demoing each feature.

In other news, Google's announced Instant Pages (also demoed after the break), which promises to speed up browsing by prerendering results when its "confident you're going to click them." It's available in the latest developer version of Chrome today, and will also be included in the next public beta. Lastly, Google took the wraps off a number of revisions to its mobile search offerings, including a new set of icons and enhanced local features when browsing on a phone, as well as some revamped search and image results that have been specifically tailored to tablets.

Developing...

Continue reading Google announces Search by Image, Search by Voice for desktop, revamped mobile search

Google announces Search by Image, Search by Voice for desktop, revamped mobile search originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 14 Jun 2011 13:32:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceOfficial Google Blog  | Email this | Comments
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Today’s World IPv6 Day: Google, Bing, Facebook and others test out new addresses for 24 hours

Described as a "test flight" of IPv6, today marks the biggest concerted effort by some of the web's marquee players to turn us all on to the newer, fancier web addressing system. Internet Protocol version 4 has been the template by which we've addressed everything connected to the web so far, but that stuff's now nearing exhaustion, so the future demands a longer, more complex nomenclature to tell our smartphones, tablets, printers, and other webOS devices apart. For end users, June 8th won't really feel too different from June 7th -- this will be a change that occurs mostly behind the scenes and there's an IPv4 fallback option if you can't connect in the modern way -- but Google does warn that a very limited subset of users may experience connectivity issues as a result. Hit the links below to see how well prepared for the future you are.

Today's World IPv6 Day: Google, Bing, Facebook and others test out new addresses for 24 hours originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 08 Jun 2011 04:44:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceWorld IPv6 Day, IPv6 readiness test  | Email this | Comments
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Google Translate API gets reprieve, servers will accept cash for interpreter duties

Last month, Google said it intended to pull the plug on a variety of APIs, including one rather curious pick -- Google Translate, which had actually been getting so much use that it was allegedly causing an "economic burden" for the company. Well, it seems Google got in touch with its capitalistic roots, because the Translate API won't be depreciated after all. Following a public outcry, Mountain View's announced that it'll create a paid version as soon as possible. Hear it from the horse's Google API Product Manager's mouth at our source link.

Google Translate API gets reprieve, servers will accept cash for interpreter duties originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 06 Jun 2011 01:29:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink All Things D  |  sourceGoogle Code Blog  | Email this | Comments
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Adobe CEO has no beef with Apple, no answer for poor Flash performance on Android (video)

The Adobe-Apple Flash war used to be one of the juiciest catfights around, but, much like two aging boxers, both sides now appear willing to act like adults put it all behind them. Speaking at yesterday's D9 conference in Palos Verdes, California, Adobe head Shantanu Narayen confirmed that he and Steve Jobs have reached an unofficial armistice, bringing an end to their prolonged war of words. According to the CEO, Apple's Flash issues stemmed from the company's "business model," rather than any legitimate concerns over quality. "It's control over the app store that's at issue here," Narayen said, implying that Flash's wide-ranging platform compatibility may not have jibed with the Cupertino ethos. He went on to remind moderator Walt Mossberg that developers can still use Adobe's AIR software to get their products to the App Store, adding that his company is looking forward to the rise of HTML5 and "actively contributing" to its development.

Mossberg, meanwhile, seemed to blindside Narayen when he brought up Flash's poor performance on Android devices. "I have yet to test a single one where Flash tests really well," the columnist claimed. "I'm sorry, but it's true." Narayen sputtered a bit, before pointing to the BlackBerry PlayBook as an example of the progress that Flash has made. When Mossberg reminded him that the PlayBook doesn't run on Android, the CEO not-so-subtly sidestepped the question by emptily declaring that Adobe's mission is simply to provide people with the best tools to create content. Apparently satisfied with this non-answer, Mossberg changed the subject back to Apple, allowing Narayen to wax poetic about their new Pax Romana -- and, perhaps, to breathe a sigh of relief. See the full interview after the break.

Continue reading Adobe CEO has no beef with Apple, no answer for poor Flash performance on Android (video)

Adobe CEO has no beef with Apple, no answer for poor Flash performance on Android (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 03 Jun 2011 06:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Huffington Post  |  sourceAllThingsD  | Email this | Comments
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Researchers hack Kinect for glasses-free 3D teleconferencing (video)


Since the dawn of Kinect hacking, we've seen cameras strung together (or rotated) to create 3D, video game-like environments, while others have tweaked it for headtracking. Others, still, have used it for teleconferencing (albeit, the flat, two-dimensional variety). Now, a team of researchers have gone and thrown it all together to achieve 3D video chats, and if we do say so, the result is greater than a sum of its parts. The group, based out of UNC-Chapel Hill, uses 3D mapping (and at least four Kinects) to render the video, and then employs headtracking on the receiving end so that people tuning in will actually see the live video in 3D, even without wearing 3D glasses. The result: a tableau that follows you as you move your head and spin around restlessly in your desk chair waiting for the meeting to end. That's mighty impressive, but we can't help but wonder: do you really want to see your colleagues in such lifelike detail? Have a gander at the video and decide for yourself.

Researchers hack Kinect for glasses-free 3D teleconferencing (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 19:46:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Sony Pictures hacked by Lulz Security, 1,000,000 passwords claimed stolen

Oh, Sony -- not again. We've just received numerous tips that Lulz Security has broken into SonyPictures.com, where it claims to have stolen the personal information of over 1,000,000 users -- all stored (disgracefully) in plain text format. Lulz claims the heist was performed with a simple SQL injection -- just like we saw the last time around. A portion of the group's exploit is posted online in a RAR file, which contains over 50,000 email / password combos of unfortunate users. We've downloaded this file (at our own risk, mind you) and can verify these sensitive bits are now in the wild, though it remains unclear if what's published matches reality. In addition to user information, the group has blurted out over 20,000 Sony music coupons, and the admin database (including email addresses and passwords) for BMG Belgium employees. Fresh off the heels of the PlayStation Network restoration, we're guessing the fine folks in Sony's IT department are now surviving solely on adrenaline shots.

[Thanks to everyone that sent this in]

Sony Pictures hacked by Lulz Security, 1,000,000 passwords claimed stolen originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 17:47:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceLulz Security (1), (2)  | Email this | Comments
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Palm.com quietly replaced by HPwebOS.com, no wake to follow

It goes without saying that funerals are a downer, but we all deserve a proper sendoff, -- unfortunately for Palm.com, there will be no tearful goodbyes. We reported just a few months ago that Palm was on its way out, and now HP's unceremoniously given the brand's URL the boot. You can still find the Palm logo at a number of related URLs scattered about the internets -- the brand's support page, twitter account, and official blog are still up and running -- but try typing Palm.com in your address bar, and you'll be swiftly redirected to HPwebOS.com. And here we thought our aunt Pearl moved on quickly.

Palm.com quietly replaced by HPwebOS.com, no wake to follow originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 16:31:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink PreCentral  |  sourceHpwebos.com  | Email this | Comments
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Apple wants to make your calendar sensitive to location and traffic, get you there on time

As Apple rushed to allay privacy concerns over its handling of location data, it also let slip that it was working on a "crowd-sourced traffic database". Now a patent application dating from 2009 has been made public which suggests Apple is thinking of this technology not merely as an add-on to iOS Maps, but as something which could feed into other areas such as calendars and alarms. The implicit suggestion is that if Apple can figure out how long it will take you to get from A to B, then it should be able to adjust your appointments to make sure you get there on time without having to go on a rampage. Until then, if everyone just stays out of the way, then no one will get hurt.

Apple wants to make your calendar sensitive to location and traffic, get you there on time originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 15:50:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Apple Insider  |  sourceUSPTO  | Email this | Comments
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