Malacandra.me

Latest Posts

Garmin nüvi navigators get refreshed, countless new models for 2012

Garmin 2012 Navigator Lineup
It's time for Garmin to refresh its lineup and flood the market with a slew of dash-mounted GPS devices. In total there are six new series of navigators, with countless models scattered amongst them. The "essential" nüvi 30, 40 and 50 (top left) lines come in three sizes: 3.5-inch, 4.3-inch, and 5-inch sizes (we're sure you can guess which is which), and cover all the basics including a lifetime's worth of free map updates. Stepping up a notch to the "advanced" 2405 (top right) and 2505 series (4.3-inch and 5-inch lines respectively) nets you Garmin's Guidance 2.0 system. The software includes niceties like 3D traffic updates (for free, of course) and photoReal junction view for finding the right lane at off ramps. Last is the "prestige" line -- the nüvi 3400 series -- ultra-thin, 4-inch devices that looks more like a phone than a navigator. The 3400s turn in the frustrating resistive screen for a capacitive panel and upgrade to Guidance 3.0. The 3.0 edition sports all the same features as its lower numbered sibling, but adds pinch-to-zoom, lane guidance and text-to-speech for incoming SMS messages. Not overwhelmed enough yet? Check out the PR after the break.

[Thanks, Devin]

Continue reading Garmin nüvi navigators get refreshed, countless new models for 2012

Garmin nüvi navigators get refreshed, countless new models for 2012 originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 24 Aug 2011 14:06:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments
comments

Conductive nanocoating could lead to flexible, wearable devices, Lady Gaga sticks with meat suit

Flexible is the new rigid in the gadget world, from OLED panels and e-paper displays to, of course, the adorable PaperPhone. Now researchers at North Carolina State University are hoping to take flexible to the next level by applying a conductive nanocoating - thousands of times thinner than a human hair - to ordinary textiles. Their technique, called atomic layer deposition, grows an inorganic coating atop cloths like woven cotton. The treated fabric conducts electricity, opening the door to thin, wearable devices with the flexibility of everyday clothing. The technology's still in its nano-infancy, but who knows: maybe a few years from now you'll be sporting a genuinely playable Angry Birds shirt.

Conductive nanocoating could lead to flexible, wearable devices, Lady Gaga sticks with meat suit originally appeared on Engadget on Fri, 10 Jun 2011 03:32:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Gizmag  |  sourceNorth Carolina State University  | Email this | Comments
comments

Droid X2 review

Would a Droid X by any other name smell as sweet? When we reviewed that phone last year we found it to be a solid performer in a solid chassis. In short: a very good phone. Now it's back with a new name, or a revised one at least, the Motorola Droid X2 offering the same basic design as its predecessor but packing a lot more heat on the inside -- a dual-core dose of Tegra 2, to be specific. Will it tickle your olfactory sensors just like the first X?

Continue reading Droid X2 review

Droid X2 review originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 05 Jun 2011 12:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments
comments

Apple camera patent could stop smartphone bootleggers in their tracks

Apple Infrared Camera System
Apple is always filing patents for strange and fantastic things that never seem to find their way into actual products. But an application published today details some interesting tech that we could actually see getting jammed into a future iPhone (for better or worse). By pairing an infrared sensor with the camera already on board, portable devices could receive data from transmitters placed, well, wherever. Beyond simply blasting out text and opening links like a glorified QR code, transmitters could disable certain features, such as the camera, to prevent recording at movie theaters and music venues. If completely shutting off the cam seems a bit heavy-handed, watermarks can also be applied to photos identifying businesses or copyrighted content. Some potential uses are a little less Big Brother, like museums beaming information about exhibits to a user's or launching an audio tour. Obviously third parties would have to get behind the IR push and there's no guarantee that Apple will put this in a future iProduct. Still, we're a little worried that the days of blurry YouTube concert videos may be coming to an end.

Apple camera patent could stop smartphone bootleggers in their tracks originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 02 Jun 2011 20:42:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Patently Apple  |  sourceUS Patent Office  | Email this | Comments
comments

Creative Live! inPerson HD webcam does onboard processing, doesn’t milk your CPU

When Logitech and Microsoft released a bunch of HD webcams last year, Skype refused to certify them for use with its HD video calling service. (That's not to say these webcams won't work with Skype HD -- it's that Skype won't guarantee that they'll work well.) And why this resounding slap in the face? Because Skype will only certify HD webcams that come with onboard video processing and therefore run even on tardy old machines. And that is precisely why Creative has followed the lead of other manufacturers like FaceVsion and Freetalk in including a built-in H.264 encoder with its latest offering, maintaining judder-free video and a chill-axed CPU. The webcam also has more flexible autofocus and a "quad mic" system, which together should allow users to sit as far as 10 feet away and still be seen and heard clearly. The only problem? A $150 price tag that's significantly more than the competition and only slightly easier to face than your cousin's acne condition at 720p. If you're still keen though, check out the PR after the break.

Continue reading Creative Live! inPerson HD webcam does onboard processing, doesn't milk your CPU

Creative Live! inPerson HD webcam does onboard processing, doesn't milk your CPU originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Jun 2011 20:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceCreative  | Email this | Comments
comments

Kingston Wi-Drive wireless storage for iOS preview (video)


Thinking about upgrading your iPad or iPhone just to add more storage for videos, photos and music? Kingston hopes to save the day with its Wi-Drive, a WiFi-enabled battery-powered storage device designed exclusively for use with iOS. Several factors make the pocket-sized device a tough sell, however, including its cost ($130 for 16GB, $175 for 32GB), and the fact that this otherwise clever content sharing contraption adds yet another gadget to your already crowded portable mix. We'd probably save up for a new, higher-capacity device before accessorizing our old gadgets, but a compact media server does seem like the perfect companion for a road trip, serving up HD videos and other content simultaneously to multiple devices using the free iOS app. This is strictly a content server -- while you can move move content off the drive and later transfer it back, there's no backup tool included, and Kingston says we shouldn't expect one in the future, either. Click past the break for our impressions of Kingston's flash-based server, due to hit stores later this month.

Continue reading Kingston Wi-Drive wireless storage for iOS preview (video)

Kingston Wi-Drive wireless storage for iOS preview (video) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Jun 2011 20:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments
comments

Gecko-inspired water-powered robot scales glass, washes windows (sort of)

We've seen some pretty impressive Spidey-like robots in our time, but honestly, crawling walls isn't always enough to pique or interest. A robot that can scale buildings and wash windows -- now that's something to get excited about. Like this little wall climber, the gecko-inspired machine enlists the Bernoulli principle, using the flow of water through fluidic vacuum generators that allow the reptilian robot to get a grip on smooth surfaces. Next, the water is directed through a solenoid valve to a piston in the robot's spine, and finally, the excess liquid is expelled and used to get glass gleaming. Currently, the little machine is capable of carrying twice its weight, and uses a small battery to power a "wireless communication system" and the servos used to control its direction. We're definitely intrigued, but judging from the video (after the break), we're pretty sure it's no match for flesh and blood window washers.

Continue reading Gecko-inspired water-powered robot scales glass, washes windows (sort of)

Gecko-inspired water-powered robot scales glass, washes windows (sort of) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Jun 2011 16:55:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink Coolest Gadgets, ieee spectrum  |  sourceICRA  | Email this | Comments
comments

Barnes & Noble Nook WiFi review

Many who follow the e-reader market keep coming back to the same question: how long does it realistically have left? The explosion of tablets and reader apps for smartphones have left their respective impacts on the space, while the market for devoted readers continues to be dominated by Amazon's Kindle. Undaunted, both Kobo and Barnes & Noble launched new black and white e-readers based around the same touch and display technologies last week. After all, despite increased competition from outside the space, the reader market continues to be a vibrant one -- and after the Nook Color proved it was an undercover tablet all along, Barnes and Noble has hit back with this latest Nook as proof of its focus on one thing: reading.

Continue reading Barnes & Noble Nook WiFi review

Barnes & Noble Nook WiFi review originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Jun 2011 12:07:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments
comments

Turtle Beach announces PX3 and Z6A gaming headsets, set to debut at E3

Turtle Beach impressed the pants off of us last month with its Ear Force PX5 headset, which is why our mouths began watering when we found out that the company has two new gaming products on the way -- the Ear Force PX3 and Z6A. Much like the PX5, the wireless PX3 (pictured above) boasts 18 interchangeable audio settings and supports additional presets that users can download directly from Turtle Beach. Though it was designed with PS3 users in mind, the PX3 can also run on an Xbox 360 and is the first Turtle Beach headset to feature a rechargeable, ten-hour battery.

The Xbox-friendly, surround sound Z6A, meanwhile, rocks eight amplified speakers (including two subwoofers) and is juiced by a 5.1 channel amp that promises to bathe your head with booming bass. The USB-powered device may leave you tethered to your console, but at least it will house your ears in an oversized mesh cushion, which may make those late-night gaming marathons a little more bearable. The PX3 will retail for about $150, with the Z6A set at around $100, and both headsets will be on display at E3 next week in Los Angeles, so we'll be sure to give you our feedback once we get our paws on them. For now, you can sate your appetite with the full PR and an image of the Z6A -- both of which are waiting for you after the break.

Continue reading Turtle Beach announces PX3 and Z6A gaming headsets, set to debut at E3

Turtle Beach announces PX3 and Z6A gaming headsets, set to debut at E3 originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Jun 2011 09:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |   | Email this | Comments
comments

uBeam wireless power startup shows prototype at D9 (video hands-on)

As seems to be the case each year, one or two stars show up to demonstrate new technology here at the All Things D 'Science Fair,' and it just so happens that a pair from the University of Pennsylvania are soaking up the limelight this go 'round. uBeam's the company, and based on what we saw at D9, we're guessing that you'll be hearing an awful lot more from the duo in the coming months. The company's mission is to provide wireless power -- hardly a new concept, but it's all sorts of refreshing to see what's often thought of as a pipe dream get an injection of reality. The outfit is literally comprised of two people for the moment, with the prototype shown here concocted just a few weeks ago.

The goal? To get uBeam transmitters installed in as many locales as possible, and then to hit critical mass from a device standpoint. Imagine walking into a restaurant with uBeam transmitters in the ceiling, and watching your handset magically recharge as you await your appetizer. Granted, the outfit's a long way from that -- its first product will be a small charging puck that'll connect to a bevy of USB devices. That'll pair with an enterprise or consumer-level transmitter, a device that will ideally be situated in a ceiling. For now, things are strictly line-of-sight, but the shipping system will be able to detect a uBeam puck in the room and charge it if it's anywhere within a 20 to 30 foot radius. We're told that the consumer version will be suitable for piping power to just a handful of devices, whereas the enterprise build will be able to juice up an undisclosed amount more. Care to learn more? Head on past the break.

Continue reading uBeam wireless power startup shows prototype at D9 (video hands-on)

uBeam wireless power startup shows prototype at D9 (video hands-on) originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Jun 2011 08:00:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink   |  sourceuBeam  | Email this | Comments
comments

 1 2 3 >